Gary Miller Songs

"As a song poet there are few in the world today to match him"
Green Man Review, USA

Mad Dogs and Englishmen - 'Going Down With Alice'

Released: 2000

Label: Whippet Records / Downwarde Spiral Records

Format: CD

Cat. No.: WPTCD19 / DR009CD

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Track Listing
1. A Rich Seam (4:27)
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2. House of War (4:04)
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3. Kater Murr (4:05)
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5. Canard's Grace (5:47)
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6. Cynthia's Revels (3:04)
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7. Seven Hills (4:06)
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8. Land, Sea and Sky (3:38)
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10. Full Circle (5:32)
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Credits

Tracks 1,4, 7, 9, 10 written & composed by Gary Miller
Tracks 2, 3, 5, 6, 8 written & composed by Joseph Porter

Recorded at The Old Dairy Studio, York during March and April 2000

Engineered by Phil Elliott, who also stamped and shouted, but only in the right places.

Mixing completed at Trinity Heights, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne by Fred Purser.

Mad Dogs and Englishmen:
Glenn Miller - accordions
Joseph Porter - guitar, percussion, vocals
Gary Miller - guitar, mandolin, vocals

 

Notes

Mad Dogs and Englishmen was a unique collaboration between Gary Miller and Glenn Miller of The Whisky Priests and Joseph Porter of Blyth Power. ‘Going Down With Alice’ is a stripped to the bones all-acoustic recording with vocal and songwriting duties shared by Gary and Joseph, led by Glenn’s inventive accordion arrangements.

 

Reviews /Quotes

“Porter and the Millers actually write great songs with words that mean something and are usually substantially rooted. This reminds you how subtle these guys actually are.”
(Folk Roots, UK)


“This collaboration draws the template for what folk-rock could and should be in a world anxiously wrestling with newfound fashions and freedoms.”
(Folk on Tap, UK)